Holiday hours

December 19, 2013

Custom Protect Ear passes another year

As we come to an end of another year 2013, we would like to extend our gratitude and thank all of our partners, vendors and customers in supporting our vision in obtaining a safe working environment through Hearing Loss Prevention Programs.

Cpe hours

Our Hours of Operation during the holiday season are as follows:

December 23, 2013 – 830am – 12pm (Pacific Standard Time) 

December 24, 2013 – 830am – 12pm

December 25 – 27th – CLOSED 

December 31, 2014 – 830am – 12pm 

January 1, 2014 – CLOSED 

This year has been another rewarding year. We had the opportunity to launch our USA website site: www.protectear.com/us, PLUS we also launched our newest and latest product, FitCheck Solo. FitCheck Solo allows wearers to check the attenuation of specific earplugs to ensure maximum protection against noise.

At Custom Protect Ear, we are continuing our pursuit in providing a safe and healthy work environment with our Hearing Loss Prevention products and programs.

From our home to yours…. we wish you a safe and happy

Holiday Season.

Warm Regards,

Jeffrey Goldberg | President
Custom Protect Ear

Advanced Hearing Support The Dangerous Decibels Project

December 4, 2013

The Dangerous Decibels Project

Advanced Hearing Support The Dangerous Decibels Project

Advanced Hearing supports various groups that advocate hearing safety. One of these is the Dangerous Decibels Project. This public health campaign is designed to reduce the prevalence of noise-induced hearing loss in school-age children.

 

December 4, 2013) Virginia Beach, Virginia – The Dangerous Decibels Project was organized to bring attention to the problem of noise-induced hearing loss or NIHL as well as tinnitus in school-aged children.  The program aims to change knowledge, attitudes and behaviors of these children to help them protect their hearing.  Advanced Hearing is dedicated not only to providing hearing aids for children but also to preventing hearing loss through education and changed behaviors.

According to the Dangerous Decibels Project website located at www.dangerousdecibels.org, hearing damage can occur at decibel levels over 85 and beyond eight hours per day.  School children are often exposed to East Inflatable Rentals far more than this in an average school day.  Dangerous Decibels advocates for companies to provide low cost hearing aids for children but also gives tips to avoid hearing loss altogether, including “Turn It Down,” “Walk Away” and “Protect Your Ears.”

Advanced Hearing provides discount hearing aids for both adults and children who have already suffered hearing loss.  In order to find the best hearing aid for an individual, Advanced Hearing offers hearing aid comparisons of behind the ear hearing aid models, digital and in-ear hearing aids and other brands.  Unlike companies that sell hearing aids online, Advanced Hearing is ready to compare hearing aids and give clients all the facts about every model.

Those who are interested in the facts about hearing loss and the work done by Dangerous Decibels can read more about it on the Advanced Hearing website at www.advancedhearing.us/hearing-education/educational-articles.  For an in-office hearing aid comparison and free test, clients can make an appointment with Advanced Hearing for their consultation.  Other products are also available on the website at www.advancedhearing.us/products/hearing-aids.

About Advanced Hearing

Advanced Hearing provides hearing aid services for clients of all ages.  With an advanced hearing aid center that provides free hearing aids comparisons for behind the ear hearing aids, digital hearing aids and other models, Advanced Hearing gives clients the information to make the right choice about their hearing assistance options.  Those who have suffered hearing loss, are having trouble making out words or who simply want to test their hearing and see how a hearing aid could help them are welcome to contact Advanced Hearing for a free consultation.

For More Information:  www.advancedhearing.us

dB Cares™ about Breast Cancer

September 22, 2013

Together Change is Possible… db Cares

dB Cares™ is a Custom Protect Ear initiative created to address the impact our doing business has on the environment and to help support the people and communities where we live and work. CPE donates a portion of what we make to charity each year. One of our community initiatives is a program that partners with our customers to support breast cancer research. By matching the $5.00 added to the purchase of each pair of pink Blockers, CPE donates $10.00 to the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation.

dB Cares™ contribution to Breast Cancer Water Obstacle

This is a subject that is close to many of our hearts, and we are excited to report that through the diligent efforts of our reps and valued customers, through our dB Cares Program we have raised $18,519.00 in donations to breast cancer research. We presented this cheque to the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation in August 2013 (pictured below). 

db cares

dB Cares™ For The Community

dB Cares Breast Cancer

Your support of our products allows CPE to donate a portion of what we make to charity each year, and facilitate ways in which to raise additional money for causes that touch our stakeholders personally. Some of the ways we commit ourselves to the community are:

  • - Fund raising for community initiatives.See what we’re doing for Breast Cancer Research.
  • - Giving support to local food banks.
  • - Supporting community centers that offer programs for the economically disadvantaged.
  • - Encouraging our stakeholders to become more actively involved in their local communities.

 

Learn how you can be apart of dB Cares. 

Custom Molded Earplugs

February 4, 2013

Custom Protect Ear has been providing custom hearing devices for over 25 years. The custom molded ear products sometimes called Personalized Hearing Protection, are just as, if not more, effective for the prevention of noise-induced hearing loss as are disposable earplugs.

What is a custom-moulded earplug?

A custom-moulded earplug is a laboratory-made earplug made from moulds taken by trained experienced impression takers. In North America the experienced impression takers may be audiologists, licensed hearing aid dispensers, or impression takers well trained by the manufacture. Most often, these are made of acrylic or soft silicone that can fit the ear and the ear canal tightly. The advantage of the softer earplugs is they change shape slightly as the wearer’s ear canal changes shape when talking or chewing, thereby continuing to seal during those activities.This deems to have great benefits when working in high activity – noise induced environments.

The custom-moulded earplugs are typically delivered in a protective storage/carrying pouch and will be accompanied with a tube of lubricant (most often petroleum jelly).dB-blocker-

The lubricant is applied to the earplugs during their initial use/break in period. The lubricant makes the earplugs easier to insert and also softens the interface of the earplug and ear improving comfort.

After about ten or so uses with the lubricant applications can stop as the silicon should have absorbed enough material to be easily inserted for the life of the earplug.

What is a disposable earplug?

So-called “foam” and pre-moulded earplugs are designed to be used for one time or in some cases, a few times. Exceptions to this restriction are those very expensive earplugs such as the Hi-Fi or military earplug that can be cleaned for repeated use.

Until the 1970’s the most common earplug was the V51-R made from soft silicone, a single-flange earplug developed for the military that came in five sizes. Because it didn’t work well, it required precise fitting.  Eventually it was discontinued due to repeated pressures from the scientists and practitioners in the hearing health community. Later other earplugs were developed with multiple flanges. ear plugs

When is a “custom-moulded” earplug NOT “custom”, but really a long-term use disposable earplug?

Simply put: Earplugs directly made from the impression materials, which can be considered as fitter-formed or mould-in-place, are not custom-moulded earplugs (Lake, 2012). This is true for a variety of reasons.

First and foremost is the impression material. Impression materials now used for laboratory-made custom-moulded earplugs are designed for the purpose of taking the impression and holding shape whist in transit to and whilst being processed to make moulds by the laboratory. Fitter-formed impression material is intended to become the final product and so it “cures” while setting during the impression process. In order for this to work, the fitter-formed impression material is more viscous than impression materials used for laboratory-made custom-moulded earplugs. As such, the likelihood of an impression free from flaws and with a faithful rendering of the shape of the concha and helix as well as the pinna and ear canal is small.

The impression for the laboratory-made custom-moulded earplug is also usually a silicone product made from mixing a base putty with a liquid or gel activator. Some laboratories use two-part silicone materials that combine catalyst and silicone in 50/50 proportion. The result is far less viscous material than used for the fitter-formed products; its viscosity is such that it may be put into a syringe for injecting into the ear canal and concha and helix of the pinna.

Second is the impression process. Fitter-formed products use putty created from combining a base putty with a liquid activator and then folding them until blended. That putty begins to cure immediately but has less-than a three-minute time window when it will be malleable. The putty is rolled into a cylinder and the pushed down the ear canal and padded into the concha and helix of the pinna. Once it seems to have cured, it is removed from the ear and trimmed. Handles or the ends of cords may have been attached after the insertion but before the impression cured.

For a custom-moulded laboratory-made earplug, following otoscopy, a cotton or foam dam is placed into the ear canal with its placement confirmed by otoscopy so that there is no chance for the impression material to travel deeply enough to make contact with the eardrum. As well, if the ear canal has excessive cerumin, the ear canal may be cleaned by the audiologist taking the impression or the person may be referred to his or her own physician to have the ear canals evaluated and cleaned – the exact procedure depends on locality and regulatory requirements.

Then, the impression material is injected to fill the entire ear canal between the dam and the opening of the canal behind the tragus and finally the bowl of the concha and the helix are filled.  There is a debate over whether the mouth should be closed, opened, or slightly opened during the time it takes for the impression material to set. The mouth slightly open (relaxed or with a bite block of 20 mm or so that) has been shown to provide better bass than mouth closed when the earplug is modified to be used with insert earphones. There have been no published studies of the differences in noise reduction between laboratory-made custom-moulded earplugs made from mouth-relaxed versus mouth-closed impressions.

Once the impression material has set, it is carefully removed from the ear, inspected to make sure there are no creases, ridges, or other malformations, and put into a package to be sent to the laboratory. There is no trimming done by the impression taker.

The experience and training of the impression taker is also very important. Depending upon locality and professional licensing regulations, the impression taker may have been trained by the laboratory making the custom-moulded earplugs, or have academic or clinical training in impression taking.  In any case, once the impression reaches the laboratory, its staff can determine the quality of the impression and may ask for a second impression if the first has flaws that the laboratory can’t adjust.

Already in the hands of some audiologists are laser scanners that can make a digital image of the impression, and the image goes to the laboratory for further processing to make the mould from which the earplug is made. As the image is stored digitally, so long as the file is not corrupted, it is possible to make as many earplugs from one impression as necessary for as long as is necessary. Soon to come will be digital imaging of the ear canal and pinna, so that there will be no use of impression material, as the image of the ear will be sent to the laboratory to be process into an earplug.  Either of these techniques should remove impression making from the hands of amateurs and DIY’ers.

Learn more about the advantages of Custom Molded Earplugs “Download the Whitepaper”.

 

What dB Blocker wearers are saying. 

 “I would like to say thanks I have had my db blocker vented convertible ear plugs for the past 7 years I would like to say that you guys make the best ear plugs I have come across I am a welder I have bin in the industry for the past 10 years. That are worth every penny great quality. Thanks you so much I will be going to my boss’s at my work (national steel car) to get all my brothers a pair of Db blockers.”

~ Babb Matt – National Steel Car.

ProtectEar USA

December 3, 2012

Protect ear usa American-flag-

Protectear-USA-Logo-b.sm

Custom Protect Ear is now associated with ProtectEar USA

November 25. 2012, Surrey BC, Canada.
Custom Protect Ear (CPE) would like to inform all of our respected readers and customers that we, Custom Protect Ear, is associating with ProtectEar USA to further our position in the U.S. market.

Through this association Custom Protect Ear and ProtectEar USA will be better positioned to serve their US clients. This association will NOT change the dB Blocker or dB Com pricing structure or the existing sales representative(s) – everything will remain as is.

For Custom Protect Ear Customers

The ProtectEar USA and Custom Protect Ear partnership will affect the accounting departments accounts payable process. To ensure there is no confusion we have sent the accounting department and the operations department a letter indicating the payment process changes. We value all of our customers’ business is at ProtectEar USA and Custom Protect Ear.

If you have any questions or need to other arrangements please contact us at 1-800-520-0220 ext 306 or click here for contact information. 

 

Staff Appreciation day!

August 2, 2012

Custom Protect Ear appreciates your hard work!

Another year has passed and Custom Protect Ear remains to be the leader in hearing conservation.


great job

Today, August 3, 2012 – The Custom Protect Ear Office will be closed from 9am – 2pm to recognized the team and the people who have contributed to CPE’s success in making the Smartest Hearing Protection in the World. We want you to know that no hard work goes unrecognized and we will continue to appreciate and encourage you to to the work you are doing. So today everyone pat yourselves on the back and enjoy the festivities…

Custom Protect Ear.

Custom Protect Ear announcement

Today is the Staff Appreciation day at Custom Protect Ear so the office will be shut down between 9:15 am to 2:00 pm. CPE will take the time to appreciate the amazing team that helps professionals, individuals and companies protect their hearing and educate them on hearing conservation. A special thank you to the Custom Protect Ear team!

Cost of ‘Do It Yourself Travel’.

June 11, 2012

Cost of Noise? Or Cost of Traveltravel expensive

“Normally I don’t use this blog for personal issue BUT recently I had an experience that has caused me to want to cross that line.”  

I was recently at the American Society of Safety Engineers Conference (ASSE) which coincided with the National Hearing Conservation Association annual executive council meeting – a whole lot of hearing conservation in Denver this week (shh).

The conference was well attended and Custom Protect Ear was busy.  In the trade show we were inundated with companies that had challenges in their hearing conservation programs asking if we could help them. If someone asked us what Denver looks like our answer would have to be 16th Street? Why? Because we spent every evening dining and walking on 16th street; a delightful mix of shops, restaurants, with free bus service running the 1/2 mile of the street.

OK enough of the travelogue. What has cause me to personalize this, is my attempt to return home, back to Vancouver BC. Stories about airline travel and what has happened to it are legend. Most of us who fly harken back to the “good old days” when flying was somewhat pleasant.  I’m not sure we recognized that those were the good days back then, but with hindsight, they were certainly better. This march toward airline efficiency has delegated the process of flying to the individual and the public.  We are encouraged to be our own travel agents using Expedia, Travelocity, Kayak, Orbitz, Priceline, Hotwire and others.  The pricing for hotel rooms, airline seats, tours all are subject to extreme variability.  We can buy or own seats directly from the airline, book our hotel rooms directly from the hotel, and even look for our luggage on line.

Before I make my point, a word of qualification. I love computers and computing. I have been computer semi literate since 1984 when I bought my first Texas Instruments P.C. I’ve travelled with a computer since Toshiba launched the 1100 dual disk drive portable.  All of this is by way of saying I’m not afraid of computing.  That said, I think all of us should immediately stop booking our own travel and return to using professionals.  Firstly they need the work.  More importantly, the airlines have made the process of booking travel a minefield of potential hurt.  Let me give you an example of what happened to me just last night.

The Experience

Eager to book in for my flight today, I went online to United Airlines website,as I have done many times before.  I advised United cost of travel that, yes I would be flying from Denver to Vancouver and no, I wouldn’t check any bags. Yes I’d like to see where I’m seated, as I have a preference to carry my luggage on the plane therefore, picking the right seat in advance allows me exit the plane as soon as possible.  I often prefer to sit forward so it’s easy to exit the vessel. On United getting a forward seat is known as “Economy Plus”. United charges an additional fee for a “Plus” seat, which at the time was worth it to me. But that’s where the trouble started. In my ‘seat changing option’, the United online system offered me some alternative flight choices (I was curious and thought, why not ). My meeting was ending at noon so an earlier departure could have been  worthwhile.

Here is the process I went through online:

  • Click.  3 choices, 2 obviously requiring a stop enroute and a 3rd looking like it went straight to Vancouver.  $75 dollar to change but getting home earlier is worth it.
  • Click.  Now to select a seat; this is where the wheels start to come off.  The direct flight to Vancouver is actually 2 segments stopping in San Francisco.  Well maybe that’s not so bad, let’s select a seat.  The same seat wasn’t available on that flight, requiring me to move seats in SFO. All of this led me to regret changing flights. But wait, THERE’S NO UNDO.  You cannot undo the changes you make without calling a person.  OK, I can do that. A call to United Airlines was less than fruitful and here’s how it went

 

Here is the process I went through on the phone:

  • Me: Hi there can you change my flight back to what I had originally booked with the upgrade, and get a refund on the seat change?
  • United Airlines Operator: Yes we can change you back to your original flight. However we cannot refund the fee for changing flights. And No we cannot apply the original ‘upgrade fee’ for an upgrade on this flight. Sir, you would have to pay for an additional upgrade and then claim a refund from United for the ‘original’ upgrade you had already paid for.

 

So all in all I had to take the same flight I was booked on originally and I had to pay an additional $114 because I tried to be my own travel agent. So my advice, and as I say in my everyday business, let the people who are trained and specialized in their field to ‘do the work’. Ironically, my trip was about helping professionals fight against the ‘cost of noise’,  and here in this blog I am fighting against the cost of ‘do-it-yourself travel’. The airlines are too clever and luring you into things you’ll pay for and not benefit from.  And don’t even get me started on buying this “meals” on board….

 

NAOSH WEEK: Safety & Health

May 8, 2012

Custom Protect Ear’s contribution to NAOSH WEEK: Safety & Health

“If I told you it was NAOSH week, would youNaosh Week

  • - Find a NAOSH and hug them.
  • - Send money to the save the NAOSH Fund
  • - Demand a public inquiry into why NAOSH aren’t fairly treated.”

What is NAOSH Week

NAOSH, North American Occupational Safety and Health Week is a continent wide event focusing attention on workplace health and safety and involving USA, Canada, and Mexico. Many companies in participate in NAOSH week by bringing in speakers to discuss workplace safety, set up awareness campaigns with posters and contests, host a public symposium on health and safety issues in the community, work with a local businesses etc. Click here to see more NAOSH events. 

The purpose of the event is to highlight public, government and industry importance of increasing knowledge, raising awareness and reducing injuries and illness in the workplace, home and community. NAOSH Week is led by Threads of Life, in concert with the American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE) and partners in Mexico, the Canadian Society of Safety Engineering (CSSE) in partnership with the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS)Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC), and

Custom Protect Ear’s involvement to NAOSH WEEK

Custom Protect Ear (CPE), also a member of the Canadian Society of Safety Engineering (CSSE), is North America’s largest personalized industrial hearing protector manufacturer, making hearing conservation is their only business. Custom Protect Ear serves over 4,500 companies and businesses around the globe. Their ISO certified Technicians do custom on-site fittings at their industrial sites. CPE’s mission is to be known as the “hearing conservation specialists” promoting hearing protection and hearing conservation in the workplace, community and at home.

The goal of the North American Occupational Safety & Health (NAOSH) Week is to focus the attention of employers, employees, the general public and all partners in occupational safety and health on the importance of preventing injury and illness in the workplace, at home and in the community.

CPE will contribute to the awareness campaign on occupational safety and health by striving to:

  • 1. Increase understanding of the benefits of investment in implementing hearing conservation programs in the workplace.
  • 2. Raise awareness of the long term effects that hearing loss can have on an individual during their time in a noise exposed environment.
  • 3. Educate and raise awareness to the health and safety professionals about the types of programs available to their facility when it comes to hearing protection.

 

During NAOSH week Custom Protect Ear will continue to provide information and expertise on how to prevent “noise induced hearing loss” (NIHL), and how to implement hearing conservation programs in the workplace. To learn more please visit their blog (www.protectear.com/blog) and follow their social community: Twitter/protectear & Facebook/hearingprotection.

About North American Occupational Safety and Health Week

North American Occupational Safety and Health Week – was first launched in June 1997, marked by an agreement between Canada, the United States and Mexico. NAOSH Week presents an excellent opportunity to focus, reinforce and strengthen commitment to occupational safety and health.

Participation and involvement in NAOSH Week has been shown to:

  • - improve attitudes towards safety
  • - increase understanding of the importance of occupational health & safety
  • - foster a safety-minded culture
  • - increase cooperation
  • - raise awareness
  • - assist in team building, and improve communication between employees, safety committees and safety professionals.

 

Partners in Prevention 2012: Canada’s Largest Health & Safety Event

April 30, 2012

Press Release – (May 1 – 2, 2012) Ontario Health & Safety

Mississauga, March 27, 2012 — Partners in Prevention 2012 Health & Safety Conference & Trade Show – the flagship event of the Health & Safety Ontario conference series — will welcome over 4,500 health and safety professionals, peers, industry experts and solution providers from across Canada to the Mississauga International Centre May 1 - 2 , 2012, for two-days of learning, sharing and networking in aim of preventing workplace injuries, illness and fatalities.

“Rapid changes in workplaces, our economy and workforce require all workplace parties and leaders to continuously engage in conversations supported by evidence and expertise.  Tragedies are preventable and remind all Ontarians to act, lead and engage in prevention,” says Elizabeth Mills, President & CEO of Workplace Safety & Prevention Services.  “Partners in Prevention is a catalyst for change.  This event brings together business leaders, employers, workers, researchers, educators, and solution providers and affords them deeper understanding and an increased ability to strengthen their workplace health and safety programs.”

60+ sessions, workshops and courses
Partners in Prevention 2012 offers over 60 interactive sessions, workshops and professional development courses focused on providing health and safety best practices, compliance advice and business solutions relevant to all industry sectors.  Conference content will have a strong focus on the four leading hazards affecting Ontario workplaces: motor vehicle incidents; strains and sprains; falls; and contact with machinery.

Provocative conversations with today’s leaders

Executives recognized for their organizations’ commitment to health and safety, will answer tough questions during a special, half-day session entitled View from the Top – Provocative Conversations with Today’s Leaders.  Moderated by Amanda Lang, Senior Business Correspondent with CBC News, this panel will speak candidly about their investment in health and safety and their resulting achievements of sustainability and profitability.  CEO panelists include Michelle DiEmanuele, Credit Valley Hospital and Trillium Health Centre; Stewart Hardacre, Habitat for Humanity Canada; Dean Johnson, Sodexo Canada Limited; and Senior Vice President, Energy Sector Siemens Canada Limited, Bill Smith.  This session draws high attendance from delegates eager to learn from health and safety leaders.

Three inspiring keynotes

On Tuesday, May 1, John Furlong, CEO Vancouver 2010 Olympics Organizing Committee opens the conference with his presentation, Living Leadership; the story of how he built a resilient and supportive, people-led team culture for the 2010 Vancouver Olympic Organizing Committee.  On Wednesday, May 2, Tod Maffin, Digital Technology & Marketing Guru and once founder and CEO of a multi-million dollar technology firm, shares his personal experience of depression and addiction and his struggle to hide it from employers, colleagues, family and friends.  Later that day, Michael Kerr, Motivational Speaker, Business Trainer and Humour in the Workplace Expertpresents Inspiring Workplaces — The Way Work OUGHT To Be! — an engaging discussion about how to create healthier, happier and more productive work environments.

Two trade shows and 400 exhibitors under one roof

Partners in Prevention 2012 is once again co-locating with CANECT – the Canadian Environmental Conference & Trade Show — to offer attendees access to over 400 exhibitors from across the world.  Attendees can investigate the latest products and services, ask individualized questions, build contacts with leading health and safety solution providers and participate in a number of interactive trade show presentations and booths.

Registration for Partners in Prevention 2012 is now open.  Registration details, media accreditation instructions and additional conference and trade show information can be found on theconference website.

Health & Safety Ontario (HSO) is the result of a bold move to reorganize the independent efforts of 12 health and safety associations into four streamlined organizations to better serve more than 236,000.  HSO is comprised of Infrastructure Health & Safety Association, Public Services Health & Safety Association, Workplace Safety North, and Workplace Safety & Prevention Services.  Together HSO provides health and safety solutions to employers so that they can reduce and eliminate workplace injuries, illnesses and deaths.

- 30 -

For more information, contact:

Meagan Wadeson
Communications Specialist
Workplace Safety & Prevention Services
1-877-494-9777, ext. 2233
meagan.wadeson@wsps.ca

Shane McKenna
Communications Specialist
Workplace Safety & Prevention Services
1-877-494-9777, ext. 2247
shane.mckenna@wsps.ca

Sudden Hearing Loss – First National Guidelines Published

April 5, 2012

Sudden Hearing Loss Research

The first national treatment guideline for sudden hearing loss has been developed by a panel of 19 medical experts led by Robert J. Stachler, M.D., an otolaryngologist in the Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery.  Sudden hearing loss is a condition which sends thousands of individuals in the United States to the emergency room each year. The guideline was published this month in the Journal of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. 

Dr. Stachler, said:

“In most cases, patients will have multiple visits with several physicians and undergo extensive testing before a diagnosis is made. There’s also been a lack of one or more uniformly accepted treatments, or a consensus on how to counsel patients who do fully recover their hearing. By focusing on opportunities for quality improvement, the guideline should improve diagnosis, reduce unnecessary tests and imaging procedures, and improve hearing for patients affected by sudden hearing loss.”

The team of experts developed the guideline after examining the literature and reaching a consensus for patient diagnosis, management and follow-up care. The panel included Christopher A. Lewandowski, M.D., a physician in emergency medicine, and Henry Ford’s Kathleen L. Yaremchuk, M.D., chair of the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery.

Sudden Hearing Loss

Sudden hearing loss is a rapid loss of hearing in one or both ears which can happen to an individual all at once or over a period of up to 3 days. Usually, patients report that their ear feels full or blocked. Dr. Stachler notes that as symptoms of sudden hearing loss are so prevalent and non-specific, evaluation and treatment are often delayed in several cases. Sudden hearing loss can be caused by a range of issues, such as infectious diseases, induced hearing loss, head trauma, noise induced hearing loss, Meniere’s disease, and circulatory problems.

The new guideline, which is intended for all clinicians who see patients aged 18+, includes:

  • > Information for patients regarding the benefits and risks of medical intervention
  • > Recommendations to assist clinicians in determining whether a patient with sudden hearing loss is suffering from conductive hearing loss or from sensorineural hearing loss. Although both are common causes of hearing loss, they have extremely different treatment strategies.
  • > Recommendations advising clinicians to not order computerized tomography (CT) of the head/brain as part of the initial patient assessment.
  • > A range of amplification and hearing assistive technology available to those patients with incomplete recovery of hearing.

Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss 

Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL), a subset of sudden hearing loss is also covered in the guideline. Each year in the United States approximately 4,000 new cases of SSNHL are reported. Even though the majority of patients recovery completely without the need for medical intervention, roughly 15% of patients with SSNHL experience progressive hearing loss over time.

> The guideline is published as a supplement to Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, and is available here.

> To learn more about the Department of Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery at Henry Ford, click here.